Category Archives: Comments

Commenting on blogs

The first article I chose to critique was Brent’s Building A Better Blog for 2007: Respond to Comments.  He took a look at the value of responding to comments on your blog and considered the negative and positive effects of doing so.  I wanted to expand on some of his ideas towards commenting back, or replying with an email to other bloggers that comment on your blog.  Since we are seeing the value in blogging, and primarily see it as a source of user content generation that would otherwise be inaccessible we have to value the format of blogging in general.  I think Brent was talking about this concept.

If the idea behind the internet is to generate ideas, then we, as bloggers, would be doing ourselves an injustice by not considering how our content comes across.  Now, of course, it is easy to see a positive comment complimenting your work as a source of reassurance that what you are posting is in direct correlation with how others feel; however, we must also consider negative comments.  We are creating a community online, a community of ideas, of thoughts of opinions and unique to the internet, is the ability to create social networks through associated content.  We have the amazing ability to create a sense of community.  Now, if you compare this idea to a physical community in your home town, or at your local PTA meeting, then it works the same way.  We try out ideas, good or bad, and consider their consequences accordingly.  Dissent, or disagreement is a core foundation of community, because it allows the freedom for the community to adapt its ideas.  It is a constant reminder that although we don’t always agree, we can still shape and nurture our concepts to create a more consistent and well-rounded community.    Blogging allows us to track this.  It allows us to be able to keep records of the type of concepts, content, or ideologies that do well, those that do not, and those that strike people the wrong way.  But without considering those negative effects of our content we could not possibly begin to believe that our material is as good as it could be.

Ideas flow, they generate and develop and commenting allows us to see it, and interact with the development of them.

Brent also goes on to suggest that we may not know who we are commenting to, and we need to consider that when we are commenting back.  The internet, obviously a revolutionary networking tool, is best utilized when we understand the importance of value of respectable anonymity.  People can say what they want to say without identifying themselves for the most part.  This can be bad and good.  We see the negative effect of this concept with the blogging “trolling industry”.      I also recently wrote an article on Violentacrez and his Reddit content.  You can find it HERE.

We need to understand the importance of identifying a troll who simply wants to create havoc and reducing the value of the content of our personal or professional blogs; however, we can’t afford to skip over or block user content that simply disagrees with us.  There is great value in that content.

I almost think of it like a comment, or suggestion box at a TGI Fridays.  Every month the management will review the suggestions of every patron that has something to say about the restaurant, whether good or bad.  Without the good comment, the management would not know they were doing things well, and without the bad comments they wouldn’t know what they were doing wrong.  So, we find ourselves aiming for a balance of the two.  Human nature is get better, to improve.  Improvement is dependent equally on knowing what you’ve done right and realizing what you’ve done wrong.  This is the value in responding to comments.

Let’s take a look at the concept of growing your audience.  Brent writes about the value in going to the blogger’s sites who have commented and leaving your comment on their site, as well as emailing them.  While I think emailing truly personalizes the attempt, I do not feel that it is always necessary. Often, you might come across desperate with an email and a comment on their blog. While I do agree with Brent that it is important for your blog’s traffic to not simply post the comment back on your blog, I don’t necessarily feel that we can say that there is standard of emailing commenters back every time.

We want to increase blog traffic, but we also need confidence in knowing that the reason our blogs are being visited is because of the content.  When we find ourselves over “reaching” out, we find ourselves degrading our ideas that we have posted.  Afterall, they are our ideas, and although other’s comments can help shape our ideas, our idea originated the conversation in the first place, whether good or bad. We must know this.

The second article on this topic I will critique is by Seth Simmons, with his blog posting entitled: 31 Proven Ways to Get More Comments On Your Blog. This is an all out “steroid-fueled” step by step process in getting more comments on your blog.  I like his concept of not being afraid to have an opinion on your blog, or on someone else’s for that matter.  As I mentioned before,  it is of vital importance that we understand our own value in our content.  If you have something to say, even if it is not the status quo’s belief, then you must not be afraid to say it.  That’s the beauty of blogging.  We don’t all agree and we can’t possibly begin to believe that we should.  The internet verifies the world’s diversity so by holding on to our beliefs in the blogging world, simply to avoid confrontation, we do the internet and the world an injustice.

He also talks about congratulating someone or sending positive feedback towards someone else’s blog.  This makes all the sense in the world, if we can take a step back and think of it through our own perspective when we receive a positive, reassuring comment, or “like” or “thumbs up” on our blog posts.  I personally, become instantly intrigued with the person who commented.  I most definitely go to their site and learn what they are all about. If by understanding the types of bloggers my content reaches and affects, then I can define my audience much more clearly.  Plus, if the contents of our blogs are similar we can help each other define our concepts and ideas through communication with each other.

He also uses the term “disappear” to suggest the value in not posting all the time.  One of my favorite bloggers and communication experts, Chris Brogan often suggests this idea behind not “flooding” your audience with posts.  This idea looks into attention spans and relevancy within our audiences.  While we should be confident in what we post is substantial and valuable, we should not kid ourselves into thinking the world, or our audiences wants to hear our opinion on everything.  It is easy to be arrogant in the blogging world.  For one, it is anonymous and often we aren’t necessarily held accountable for our content, and two, we might think that a large readership looks at us for our opinion on everything.  What we should be doing is understanding WHY our audiences read our blogs.   It is in the WHY that shows us our niche, our most valuable content.

I do like Seth’s idea of allowing guest bloggers to post material on your site.  This is a great idea.  This idea allows you to validate your blog through other’s thoughts and expertise, while at the same time, showing your audience that you value other’s thoughts on your topics.  This is also a great way to increase the value in your blog.

The internet also provides us with a new way of reaching other platforms, sites and medias through one click on our blog.  By adding a “retweet” button on your blog you can link twitter’s network to your blog.  Then, twitter is linked to linkedin and soon you find a link to your blog on a linkedin page with a user with a 20,000,000 network.  The internet blends lines of geography and can exponentially get your ideas across a very large, worldwide network.

He goes on to say what I feel is pretty obvious, by suggesting we write about what we are interested in.  That obviously goes without saying.  Creativity is heightened when we are interested to create.

So, as I am new the blogging world, LEAVE ME A COMMENT!  I will respond, and I will get to know you and your ideas on your blog.  We will go from there!

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